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Thread: 12L14 Holee Kowww

  1. #16
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    The darn stuff machines so well that sometimes just turning on the lathe will cause shavings to fly

    It does case harden just fine.

    Just donít try to weld it and expect things to hold together.

  2. #17
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by Al Nyhus View Post
    I don't know, Kevin.

    Having whittled a fair number of rings/bases when needed, it seems that stuff is all over the place even among the same mfg. The exception is Leupold...their stuff always cuts the same.

    Hope all is well. -Al
    Well......we're at least right about Leupold.

    I checked a few old clamshell plastic packages......and there it was....on the back....12L14.

    Later,
    Kevin

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post


    The darn stuff machines so well that sometimes just turning on the lathe will cause shavings to fly

    It does case harden just fine.

    Just donít try to weld it and expect things to hold together.
    Talley makes their bolt handles out of 12L14. I have welded quite a few of those up on Mausers. It welds great for me.

    Bill Jacobs

  4. #19
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    Nov 2016
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    St. Louis, MO
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    We used a lot of 12l14 in the manufacture of industrial magnetic brakes and clutches, and we welded a lot of shafts to rotors. Never had a weld fail.

    These units gave a "soft start", and never were subjected to the kind of shock loads or heavy loads of a maritime environment. I take Jackie at his word that it is not suited for his use when welded.
    The material is mild steel, and can be case hardened, but cannot be heat treated to a high strength condition.

  5. #20
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    washington.........STATE that is.
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    Very interesting.....

    Jackie thrives in a world where engineering limits are tested daily. Where welds will rip out by the roots and shafts will twist and warp if not fully stable. I live in a construction atmosphere where if a weld breaks on a dozer you just crank up the heat, buy a couple more bundles of stick and pour more metal into the gap......stability via the brute force approach


    Which leads me to my conundrum.



    I'm using this 12L14 to make prototype muzzle brakes for a couple big guns. Guns that will break ME if a brake fails.



    First thing I notice is that the threaded portions strip out easily. That I'm stripping out 1/4-28 grub screws under what to me is moderate tension. Second thing is that deflection both pushing and pulling is a thing........ this stuff machines like butter and moves about like modeling clay.


    Drop a piece on the floor and it dings like lead.


    Instead of making these brakes as light as possible I'm tending to leave extra meat in the high-stress areas...... let's hope I'm leaving enough !!

  6. #21
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    Aug 2005
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    might try,if you haven't already, 41L40 ( 4140 with lead added to increase production and tool life- heat treatable as well)

  7. #22
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    Jul 2016
    Location
    Surprise, AZ
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    417

    You sure you've got 12L14???

    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    Very interesting.....

    Jackie thrives in a world where engineering limits are tested daily. Where welds will rip out by the roots and shafts will twist and warp if not fully stable. I live in a construction atmosphere where if a weld breaks on a dozer you just crank up the heat, buy a couple more bundles of stick and pour more metal into the gap......stability via the brute force approach


    Which leads me to my conundrum.



    I'm using this 12L14 to make prototype muzzle brakes for a couple big guns. Guns that will break ME if a brake fails.



    First thing I notice is that the threaded portions strip out easily. That I'm stripping out 1/4-28 grub screws under what to me is moderate tension. Second thing is that deflection both pushing and pulling is a thing........ this stuff machines like butter and moves about like modeling clay.


    Drop a piece on the floor and it dings like lead.


    Instead of making these brakes as light as possible I'm tending to leave extra meat in the high-stress areas...... let's hope I'm leaving enough !!
    I have not found threads in 12L14 to strip out any more readily than those in mild steel. "What to you is moderate tension" is meaningless and condescending - threads have torque specs. Ignore them at your peril! That said, I've had no problem torquing male or female 12L14 threads to spec. I have certainly not seen any of it moving about "like modeling clay". If I drop a piece on the floor it bounces and clangs like most steel. In fact, aside from machining, or a spark test, I'd be hard pressed to separate it from 1018.

    I'm not sure what you have, and it's probably not what I'd make a brake out of in any case, but from your description it's not free-machining steel - it's lead!

    GsT

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by GeneT View Post
    I have not found threads in 12L14 to strip out any more readily than those in mild steel. "What to you is moderate tension" is meaningless and condescending - threads have torque specs. Ignore them at your peril! That said, I've had no problem torquing male or female 12L14 threads to spec. I have certainly not seen any of it moving about "like modeling clay". If I drop a piece on the floor it bounces and clangs like most steel. In fact, aside from machining, or a spark test, I'd be hard pressed to separate it from 1018.

    I'm not sure what you have, and it's probably not what I'd make a brake out of in any case, but from your description it's not free-machining steel - it's lead!

    GsT
    well I bought a 244lb stick of it from Pacific Machinery and Tool Steel so I HOPE it's the right stuff .......

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post

    Drop a piece on the floor and it dings like lead.
    Dings, not clangs......

    "ding"-deformation, nick
    "clang"-a sound

  10. #25
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    Nov 2016
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    St. Louis, MO
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    12L14 has a yield strength of 60,000 psi. It is just "mild steel", but we tapped all sorts of holes in it, and never had a problem with customers stripping threads.

    It was our go to material (primarily for it's free machining properties and its magnetic properties), and we used it for shafts, rotors, brake stators. Nothing of these required high material strength. Many of our units were steel or ductile iron castings, or 17-4 investment castings for load cells, but we tried to use 12L14 as much as possible.

  11. #26
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    Leaded steels are simply steels that have lead added at at the pour. The lead literally gets between the individual molecules of the parent metal. This is what gives these steels their free machining quality as the lead acts as an internal lubricant.

    The major drawback is ductility suffers. One of the key factors in determining a particular steels ductility is the actual cleanliness of the steel at the molecular level.

    In Leaded steels, and some high sulphurized steels, the lead or sulphur literally gets between the molecules of steel, not as a chemical bond or alloying agent, but as a simple mechanical bond.

    This is fine in applications where ductility is not a major issue. Leaded steels are rarely recommended in applications where the parts will be subjected to shock loads while under stress.

  12. #27
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    Oct 2020
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    6

    Watch out for the Rust though!

    Hey guys, I work with a lot of 12L14 and other alloys in my shop and love how easy it is to machine as well. BUT, do be sure to finish the surfaces afterward. It will rust over very quickly with any moisture/humidity. I find a cold blue treatment keeps the rust at bay pretty well. Unlike the other alloys in my rack, I don't have to worry reading labels on the 12L14 stock, it is always the brown pieces haha!

  13. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by StuNY View Post
    Hey guys, I work with a lot of 12L14 and other alloys in my shop and love how easy it is to machine as well. BUT, do be sure to finish the surfaces afterward. It will rust over very quickly with any moisture/humidity. I find a cold blue treatment keeps the rust at bay pretty well. Unlike the other alloys in my rack, I don't have to worry reading labels on the 12L14 stock, it is always the brown pieces haha!
    So True!

    I just got my order of horseshoe nails from the brown truck yesterday...... be rust-bluing me some Leadloy

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