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Thread: What it takes to win... outside gear

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by penn63 View Post
    With Winning In Mind.
    A very nice book, along with a couple others about sport mental aspects.
    All should be in your bookshelf, but not collecting dust...

    Coming from other non shooting sports (judo and Karting), and then embracing the shooting ones (archery, ISSF and later on benchrest), I do see the later is where the athletes are the least involved in mental development. All the others have a special mental training, and coaches exist. Are there benchrest coaches?

    And if you ask majority of non benchrest shooters about our sport needs, the answers are around, it's an old discipline that only needs money to buy the best rifle you can. Simple. And, let's be fair, the majority of benchrest shooters think the very same. Simple too.

    Couple years ago, during the Hamminkeln Cup, Germany, I shot with Stephane (the world record holder, 250 25x) in the same team, and we share rifles. He shot mine in LV, and I shot his in HV. Figure what he won me in LV and I did the same in HV. A fairly simple conclusion could be the rifle made the result, and swiping shooters shown that.
    But it also can be put in a different way... not being our rifle we didn't expect much, which lead to a more relaxed attitude (accepting what the range gives), and a better score appeared.

    I know that for many this mental stuff is ......, to say the least, but not trying to convince nobody. Like with gear I try stuff, and keep them if it works for me, most don't!

  2. #17
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    A more down to earth thing...

    Sitting technique...

    Leaning forward?
    Leaning backward?
    Staying upright?

  3. #18
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    Pedro, I have only shot one season in ARA, so I'm not an expert by any measure. But, I will say, having shot many a Sunday morning with a group of guys shooting aspirins at 100 yards, it's important to have a comfortable seating position. Nothing like a sore lower back to distract you from your POA. My thoughts...

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rimfireshooter View Post
    Nothing like a sore lower back to distract you from your POA. My thoughts...
    And a good input...

    I do prefer leaning forward, anatomic and physiologic reasons, because it's the most relaxing one. Being a relaxed position, uses less muscle tone to be maintained. Muscle tone is responsible for strain after a while and in extreme, tremor.
    Bear in mind also, when more than needed muscles are recruited to maintain a more "complex" or not so suitable posture is used, those muscles will drain unnecessary brain resources. Ok, motor areas, are not the same as cognitive ones, but the brain uses the same energy supply. The less used to other than needed actions, the more could be directed to cognitive areas. On top of that, not "automatic" or self sustained positions, will use conscious brain action. Every time conscious is used other than to aim, a part of focus is lost.
    Focus is key, and nothing should be hurting our focus capacity. Wrong posture is one of them...

  5. #20
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    A trap I fall into is being to relaxed when shooting at my home range. I'm too relaxed & my concentration suffers. Often times I'm not shooting my "main" rifles or ammo, experimenting with this or that & just yucking it up with the guys. Probably the worst approach one could take as to many bad habits can form. Oh, I'm having fun but that isn't the objective here.
    When practicing or at your local matches where alls real comfy, do it as best as you can. Each & every time because I feel like you can't just turn it on & off. It has to be a mindset to be competitive with the best out there.

    Keith

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by linekin View Post
    A trap I fall into is being to relaxed when shooting at my home range. I'm too relaxed & my concentration suffers. Often times I'm not shooting my "main" rifles or ammo, experimenting with this or that & just yucking it up with the guys. Probably the worst approach one could take as to many bad habits can form. Oh, I'm having fun but that isn't the objective here.
    When practicing or at your local matches where alls real comfy, do it as best as you can. Each & every time because I feel like you can't just turn it on & off. It has to be a mindset to be competitive with the best out there.

    Keith
    Very wise words.

    Practicing is one thing, testing is another thing, putting bullets down the range is another one...

    Always do serious practicing with the match gear, including ammo. Hence the plan I have talked before. Plan your training, your testing, your goals. Be honest with yourself, because that's the only way to accept your weaknesses and flaws. And if you accept them you can work to surpass them.

  7. #22
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    Without passion it does not matter what books or how you mentally train. Passion is the fuel that drives one to overcome obstacles, it moves one to their desired goals and success, without it is just wishful thoughts going nowhere.


    Regards,
    Joe

  8. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Friedrich View Post
    Without passion it does not matter what books or how you mentally train. Passion is the fuel that drives one to overcome obstacles, it moves one to their desired goals and success, without it is just wishful thoughts going nowhere.


    Regards,
    Joe
    Thanks for the input Joe.
    Passion!
    Passion is a major key driver, indeed. But if we don't have it? Should we wait for it to appear? Should we do something so we can develop it?
    No, at least in my perspective, passion is like talent, either we have it or not. So, without passion, better to find another game...
    But, and that's a big but, like in everything human, it appears and it fades away. Let's just avoid burning out, and learn to transfer passion in a more durable feeling, you know what I mean.
    Can we consider passion the opposite of burnout? Well, not quite, but the burnout is a thing that must be avoided by all means. It can develop on shooting, through different aspects... target panic, lost of interest, impatience, you name it.
    Passion is a burning fire, quoting Luís de Camões, and it's an invisible fire. Secret is keeping it alive, evolving, and transforming shooting in a way of life.
    I have never met Joe, but learned a lot about his shooting career. I do think he's one of the ones that could talk how to maintain that fire burning, the called passion!

  9. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by PedroS View Post
    Thanks for the input Joe.
    Passion!
    Passion is a major key driver, indeed. But if we don't have it? Should we wait for it to appear? Should we do something so we can develop it?
    No, at least in my perspective, passion is like talent, either we have it or not. So, without passion, better to find another game...
    But, and that's a big but, like in everything human, it appears and it fades away. Let's just avoid burning out, and learn to transfer passion in a more durable feeling, you know what I mean.
    Can we consider passion the opposite of burnout? Well, not quite, but the burnout is a thing that must be avoided by all means. It can develop on shooting, through different aspects... target panic, lost of interest, impatience, you name it.
    Passion is a burning fire, quoting Luís de Camões, and it's an invisible fire. Secret is keeping it alive, evolving, and transforming shooting in a way of life.
    I have never met Joe, but learned a lot about his shooting career. I do think he's one of the ones that could talk how to maintain that fire burning, the called passion!
    Thanks Pedro,

    We all have that passion, it is fear that stops us from pursuing it to its fullest. When one has reached that goal and without another goal is when that enthusiasm will cease.

  10. #25
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    Jun 2014
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    Establishing goals.

    How do you do it?
    How to realize that's a fair goal or not just a dream... and, can we dream to have that goal?

    Comparing to economics, micro goals and macro goals?

  11. #26
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    Jun 2013
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    When I test my rifle on a calm day with good ammo it shoots great tight groups.

    So when competition day arrives I remind myself that it ain't the rifle, it ain't the ammo, it's just down to the nut behind the butt and so a positive attitude is required.

    Windy? Well that's why we practiced in the wind so it can be your friend if you know how to handle it.

    My biggest problem is learning how to tune out exterior crap like people talking loudly behind me as this really affects my concentration.

    I was actually shooting in a competition today and the range officer interrupted me as I was about to take a shot and said that the wind had increased, I replied that I was already watching my flags, (I silently wished that he would piss off) - I pulled the shot. Lost concentration so next time I am going to buy better earmuffs!

    * doggie *

  12. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by doghunter View Post
    My biggest problem is learning how to tune out exterior crap like people talking loudly behind me as this really affects my concentration.
    .......... Lost concentration so next time I am going to buy better earmuffs!
    * doggie *
    Concentration and focus, two different beasts...
    You can concentrate and not focus but not the other way around.

    So, how to concentrate and disconnect from exterior noise? Do you mean you have an interior noise? Yes, of course, and it's this interior noise that we should take care, because that's the only one we can control.
    One simple exercise to learn to concentrate and abstract from the exterior:
    Play medium/loud, a music that you really hate.
    Pick a sheet of paper and do maths, like 2, 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, and so on...
    Each time you stop to think and listen the music, start all over again.
    Do it 3~4 times a week during 15min each until you succeed to stop listening the music, but not turning off the radio, ok?

    That's your goal, succeed to stop listening the exterior.

    One remark, buying better earmuffs, won't solve your problem, can even aggravate it, because you could be more alert to try to listen other's noise.

  13. #28
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    Feb 2010
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    295

    Noise Cancelling Headphones

    About 8 years ago I was shooting at Piney Hill. A shooter who is no longer with us had a particularly loud and piercing voice and it was impossible to tune him out. It didn't matter if he was talking about weather or politics his voice wormed its' way into my brain. As I shot I thought to myself "I wish I could just cancel his noise". Duh, the solution was obvious. I have shot with my noise cancelling headphones ever since and I'm convinced that they help create a "tunnel" to the target where no noise distractions bother me anymore.

    Over the years finding the perfect playlist was next on the agenda. I've done that but, of course, everyone's taste will vary.

  14. #29
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    Jun 2014
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    Nice to learn different solutions to the same issue... others noise.
    However, we can't use any electronics on the line, so those type of ear accessories aren't allowed.

    But we can use a double system, ear plugs and earmuffs.

  15. #30
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    Jun 2014
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    Before addressing the target...

    Let us know the very last seconds before the voice: "Start shooting"
    What do you do to prepare the card?
    Do you have a routine? Are you anxious, or nervous? How do you compose yourself?
    Or just an empty feeling...

    Does this last moments have ever made you change the card approach? Or whatever happens, you just go through...

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