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Thread: IR 50/50 Sporters

  1. #31
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    Feb 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kent Owens View Post
    Tony, I definitley agree about the dificultly, and wee bit of guessing involved, and reward of shooting a sporter well. Lots of folks never liked sporters because they never shot one that was hitting on all cylinders, ie. a good one. LOL I no longer compete, but still have some good sporters. Last one I built for myself, shot one match and won with a 250 first time out, hasn't been fired since. I just love rimfires. LOL
    There is that but the elephant in the room is that a ton of guys, particularly older guys, just have a tough time with a 6X scope, especially the guys that will not invest in a first class optic.....one you can get ALL the parallax out.
    Nobodyís eyes get better with time and the average shooter ainít getting any younger out there in IR 50 land.

  2. #32
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    May 2010
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    359
    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    There is that but the elephant in the room is that a ton of guys, particularly older guys, just have a tough time with a 6X scope, especially the guys that will not invest in a first class optic.....one you can get ALL the parallax out.
    Nobodyís eyes get better with time and the average shooter ainít getting any younger out there in IR 50 land.
    Tim,

    I agree with your points.

    But let's face it, we have become spoiled with the high power scopes.

    I remember shooting BR 50 with 16 and 24X scopes. Then we moved on to 36 power, then to 40-45 power, and now we are at 55-60X.

    We expect to see every speck on the target. Back when I started shooting I learned to target shoot with a peep sight, many others did as well.

    I shoot my sporter's 6.5X scope very much like a peep sight. I have a medium size dot. I center the dot in the middle of the large black rings on the IR 50 target.

    No, I can't hardly see the really thin crosshairs in some scopes.

    Since I can't see the smaller rings on the target holding off is a matter of judgement of how far off of center I'm holding. Just like a peep sight.

    When you have to hold off quite a lot, and you fire the shot, and look thru the spotting scope and see you took out the center dot.

    A dot you could not even see, it feels like a gift from god. That is what makes shooting a sporter special.

    If you look at it from a perspective of being able to see all the target detail you would with a more powerful scope you are missing the point.

    Yes, I think the younger guys have a slight edge, but it is only slight.

    It is all in the challenge.

    TKH

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
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    53
    Very interesting thread.

    I agree with TKH approach on judging the POA on sporter class.
    Some guys, during a match, always comment/complaint that they shot better in sporter than on LV/HV. It had also happened to me in the past.
    I took quite an in-deep thought at it, and used my previous shooting disciplines experience on sighting, focusing the reticle over the target, floating pin vs fixed aiming, and so on...
    I do agree that on sporter we are more relaxed on sighting, as we can not see well the target, and concentrate more on all other firing aspects, mainly release and followthrough.
    And there's another very important factor that plays with our subconscious... the acceptance of missing.
    On sporter that acceptance is much bigger, broadening our comfort zone. With bigger magnifications your subconscious brain conditioning is so high, just because the target is so big, that it cannot be missed, that the pressure builds up to a point where it disrupts your comfort zone and ability to stay in focus. When you perceive this happening, a different training approach is needed. And if you succeed, a growing process is established.
    Hope this makes sense.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    359
    Quote Originally Posted by PedroS View Post
    Very interesting thread.

    I agree with TKH approach on judging the POA on sporter class.
    Some guys, during a match, always comment/complaint that they shot better in sporter than on LV/HV. It had also happened to me in the past.
    I took quite an in-deep thought at it, and used my previous shooting disciplines experience on sighting, focusing the reticle over the target, floating pin vs fixed aiming, and so on...
    I do agree that on sporter we are more relaxed on sighting, as we can not see well the target, and concentrate more on all other firing aspects, mainly release and followthrough.
    And there's another very important factor that plays with our subconscious... the acceptance of missing.
    On sporter that acceptance is much bigger, broadening our comfort zone. With bigger magnifications your subconscious brain conditioning is so high, just because the target is so big, that it cannot be missed, that the pressure builds up to a point where it disrupts your comfort zone and ability to stay in focus. When you perceive this happening, a different training approach is needed. And if you succeed, a growing process is established.
    Hope this makes sense.
    Pedro,

    You got down to the point and explained a phenomenon that many have experienced but few have understood.

    You have given great insight into the psychology of shooting, a subject we rarely discuss.

    Thank you for joining this thread and adding your insight with such clarity.

    TKH

  5. #35
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    Feb 2003
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    upstate, N.Y.
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    Quote Originally Posted by tonykharper View Post
    Tim,

    I agree with your points.

    But let's face it, we have become spoiled with the high power scopes.

    I remember shooting BR 50 with 16 and 24X scopes. Then we moved on to 36 power, then to 40-45 power, and now we are at 55-60X.

    We expect to see every speck on the target. Back when I started shooting I learned to target shoot with a peep sight, many others did as well.

    I shoot my sporter's 6.5X scope very much like a peep sight. I have a medium size dot. I center the dot in the middle of the large black rings on the IR 50 target.

    No, I can't hardly see the really thin crosshairs in some scopes.

    Since I can't see the smaller rings on the target holding off is a matter of judgement of how far off of center I'm holding. Just like a peep sight.

    When you have to hold off quite a lot, and you fire the shot, and look thru the spotting scope and see you took out the center dot.

    A dot you could not even see, it feels like a gift from god. That is what makes shooting a sporter special.

    If you look at it from a perspective of being able to see all the target detail you would with a more powerful scope you are missing the point.

    Yes, I think the younger guys have a slight edge, but it is only slight.

    It is all in the challenge.

    TKH
    Tony,

    I , like you, have always approached the sporter with itís 6X, much like shooting a receiver sight. I think the higher power advocates tend to miss this very simple premise much to their detriment.
    I tend to believe the real art of sporter shooting is the fine art of ď hold off ď shooting given the reality that many ranges, including my home turf, require more than a few bulls to be shot without ability to hold dead center.
    It goes against the current grain of ,only one piece rests, under the lights, heavy guns, high power optics, etc.
    The beauty of 2 guns required for a true 3 gun agg, shot over sand bags, the way God intended.
    Itís tough, because it is supposed to be tough.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    359
    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    Tony,

    I , like you, have always approached the sporter with itís 6X, much like shooting a receiver sight. I think the higher power advocates tend to miss this very simple premise much to their detriment.
    I tend to believe the real art of sporter shooting is the fine art of ď hold off ď shooting given the reality that many ranges, including my home turf, require more than a few bulls to be shot without ability to hold dead center.
    It goes against the current grain of ,only one piece rests, under the lights, heavy guns, high power optics, etc.
    The beauty of 2 guns required for a true 3 gun agg, shot over sand bags, the way God intended.
    Itís tough, because it is supposed to be tough.
    Tim,

    We are in perfect agreement.

    It is the challenge, you either accept it, or you don't.

    It is good we have different levels of difficulty in RFBR. If we didn't we would have even less shooters than we do today.

    Pick your poison, and enjoy your shooting. I'm just glad we still have some around that choose to take the more difficult road.

    TKH

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Wilcox, PA
    Posts
    580

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by tonykharper View Post
    pedro,

    you got down to the point and explained a phenomenon that many have experienced but few have understood.

    You have given great insight into the psychology of shooting, a subject we rarely discuss.

    Thank you for joining this thread and adding your insight with such clarity.

    Tkh
    boys dont forget you better lear how to hold or never will afcomplish much. It is the one of the most impportant things in shooting bill b.

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