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Thread: I know am going to get ripped, but..........

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    105
    Quote Originally Posted by Heavies View Post
    Mine didn't want to shoot this tight. I used about 35in/lbs. Just a thought if you run into problems. YMMV
    All suggestions greatfully accepted. Unfortunately, it may be a while before the weather gets decent enough (above 40) to see how it shoots.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Uptown Bearsville, NY
    Posts
    220
    If you do get a Pacnor 308, get it 30" for the extra velocity you need for !k yds, and get a precision ground recoil lug. The factory lugs usually are .004" or so thicker at the bottom of the barrel hole. I shoot a Savage with a Krieger 308 for Palma, and cleaned the 800 and 900 targets a few times. The 1000.....naaa.
    Last edited by xs hedspace; 12-09-2010 at 10:41 AM.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    flagstaff
    Posts
    159

    f-class

    Quote Originally Posted by Herzo View Post
    All suggestions greatfully accepted. Unfortunately, it may be a while before the weather gets decent enough (above 40) to see how it shoots.
    the 30-06 is competitive , loaded properly in the right hands. go to rifleman's blog or 6mmbr. also a couple weeks ago it was -4 here in az. we don't let that bother us. roninflag

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    105
    In that it is not going to be above freezing for the next week or more, I decided to take my newly stocked Savage to a local indoor range to see what it would do. In spite of a very uncomfortable semi-standing position and a rather unstable surface on which to rest my rifle, I was able to generate a couple of pretty respectable 3 shot groups -- 1 sub-1/2" (12.2mm) and a second at just below 3/8" (9.2mm) at 100 yards. I was shooting a 180 grain Hornady BTHP ahead of enough Win 760 to get me over 2700 fps.
    It's going to be a long winter.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    I did NOT vote for Bill Jefferson
    Posts
    314
    Quote Originally Posted by Taildrag15X View Post
    Find yourself a 112 BT stock, already has adjustable cheek piece and pillars from the factory, Gun parts had them at one time for $200.
    What is a 112 BT stock? Is there a web site where I can what it looks like? I'm having a Krieger SS barrel chambered in 6.5x47 Lapua on my Rem 700, hopefully by the end of next week

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    SW Ohio
    Posts
    105
    The 112 series was a single shot version of the Savage 110 series. IIRC, it had no magazine cutout and theoretically would have had a more rigid receiver. I don't know what the specific features of the BT were, but it seems to have been one of their target models weighing in at something over 10#.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    673
    Quote Originally Posted by AndyTaber View Post
    I have a Richard's Microfit stock on my Factory Class Benchrest gun. The finished results are very good, but if you are not comfortable with woodworking, consider another stock. I ordered mine and had it direct shipped to my gunsmith for pillar bedding. He reported that the inletting was good and required a little final fitting - the barrel channel needed more. I had him leave the final finish for me and when I went to pick it up and saw it for the first time I was, rather shocked. My first impression was it looked like a landscape timber in the shape of a rifle stock. When I got it home and started sanding on it I quickly evolved to a 4" grinder with a 24 grit sanding pad on it. I removed, for the most part, over an inch of wood over most of the stock. I took the comb down an inch and a half (It was so high the bolt wouldn't open). I did run into one small void in the laminate while sanding but ended up sanding right past it to good wood anyway, so be aware it may happen. Overall I am very happy with the stock, just be prepared for way more than just "finish sanding". Good luck with the project and good shooting.
    I absolutely hate contouring and finishing wood, It takes and artist, which I am not. I am good with straight, square, predetermined measured items, contouring sanding and shaping to odd shapes that are even on both sides is out of my realm of comfort. When andy said he would finish the stocks exterior that was a huge weight off my shoulders. When the stock arrived I contemplated returning it to Richards (99% The 1 % of work required by Andy and I was rediculous). I called Andy, and tried to delicately explain the exterior finish, he said he would do the work. Great, I just did the barrel channel and the pillar bedding, the finish inletting, the bedding and the metal work. In this short action to be able to remove the bolt required (like on many raised cheekpiece rifle stocks) that I mill a groove behind the bolt for the cocking piece. As it turned out the cheekpiece would be too high for Andy so he removed a ton of wood. I must say that after Andy did his work, I almost didn't recognize the stock. He did a great job, one that any card carrying wood butcher would be proud of. Andy will be shooting at Oscoda this year (I hope) with this rifle and I anticipate him doing real well. Dad and I will help him as we can, and I hope his jump into BR is smooth and rewarding.

    Paul

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    East Tawas, Michigan
    Posts
    309
    Paul, now see what you've done....My head is so big now I can't get my hat on. Doing all of that grinding and sanding still has me thinking about making a rifle stock from scratch. Too cold out in the shop for now, it'll have to wait till Spring.

    Looking forward not only to Oscoda, I also have schedules from Harrison on the calendar already and also have been following Joe Haller up at the Soo for more punishment. I'm going to have to dust off the original stock also since another fellow club member has been after me to try F-Class. I don't want to go with Open Class and shoot my Benchrest stock off a rest, so I'm going to see what the original "tupperware" will do off a bi-pod. I just hope my 12 twist .223 will do 60 grainers justice at 600 yards. Time will tell.

    Andy

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Morrisonville, NY
    Posts
    159
    Quote Originally Posted by Herzo View Post
    The 112 series was a single shot version of the Savage 110 series. IIRC, it had no magazine cutout and theoretically would have had a more rigid receiver. I don't know what the specific features of the BT were, but it seems to have been one of their target models weighing in at something over 10#.
    The 112BT was not a Single Shot version of the 110, it is of it's own as a 112BT Competition Rifle Savage introduced in the 90's for an out of the box PALMA Rifle of sorts. Available in only .223 Rem. & .308 Win. in the beginings and later on (2000 or so) it became available in .300 Win. Mag. as a Single Shot but retained the magazine cutout in the stock. (mine at least) Stock has Adj. Cheek Piece and butt (spacer system, but room for a Graco, Tubb, etc..) Forearm Rail and vents for barrel cooling.

    NUMRICK had some listed at $199.95 each online, search firearm parts, Savage Centerfire, stocks, scroll down to 112BT....if they show for $5. less they are missing the knob for the Cheek Adj., I had one listed on 6mmbr for $175 + shipping and it didn't last.

    Here's a pic from another Forum, if it makes it:

    http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...t:429,r:11,s:0

    Here's the link to the pic: http://www.baitshopboyz.com/forum/fo....asp?TID=12047

    I'm down to the original 3 now that the extra stocks are gone, just thinnin' the heard as the barrels wear now I'm parting them out instead of rebarreling. I have 2 single shots left that no one wants, looks like they will have to go to GunBroker.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Duke View Post
    BUT, beware of the fumes. Remember CA is cyanide based.
    Cyanoacrylates are acrylic resins and not based on cyanide. Cyanoacrylate formulations are used in medical applications replacing stitches. The fumes can be irritating to mucous membranes but the volatile fumes become inert as soon as they contact moisture. As long as they are used in a ventilated area, there is no need to worry about toxicity.

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