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Thread: Shooting from a bipod

  1. #16
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    The bipod is a Harris Ultralight series S Model L. I got it as a door prize at one of the Rocky Mountain Palma Matches five or six years a go. Adjusting the legs for an intermediate position while prone was clumsy. It's only going to cost me $85 or so to add the long screws and big feet to the front rest. I'll see how that works with the option of going to the Sinclair bipod later. At least I was able to determine that I could get down and up from the prone position without too much complaint from my replacement knees. Hurt a little but not too bad. Did like shooting prone without being wrapped up in a shooting coat and sling.

  2. #17
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    Feb 2003
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    Wenatchee, WA
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    Do ya want the good news or the bad news?

    The good news... that bipod you have is probably about the least suitable option for F-Class there is, and you experienced why. The harris models with a swivel head and notched legs are several orders of magnitude better, add a pod-loc and they work well and are about as bullet proof as need be - and still lighter than many options out there. The notched legs are probably the one feature that I wish the Sinclair had - they are 'infinitely adjustable, which means if you loosen one side, it drops to the bottom - so you have to get up out of position to adjust them if need be. A Harris with notched legs, swivel head, and a pod-loc is cheaper, more compact, and way easier to get on the gun when un casing it... but the Sinclair has a much wider foot print which adds to stability. If price isn't an issue... check out the Center Shot bipods (disclaimer: a friend of mine makes/sells 'em)

    The bad news is... you probably could have gone to the local hardware store and got the equivalent hardware for about a quarter of what the Sinclair bits are costing you - if you have some basic hand tools at home. The screws are a standard thread pitch; a piece of all-thread rod cut to length and then ground to a point on the ends would work just fine. Add some knobs from the hardware store (like I said, standard thread size), and a fender washer and a couple ny-lock nuts to hold the washer in place on the thread... I have the Sinclair bits, got them when they first came out. Now my Shadetree rest uses the hardware-store variant - but then again, I like to be able to pick my stuff up and move it between yard lines with out needing vehicular assistance... guess thats why I shoot F/TR

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by milanuk View Post
    Do ya want the good news or the bad news?

    but then again, I like to be able to pick my stuff up and move it between yard lines with out needing vehicular assistance... guess thats why I shoot F/TR
    That's certainly a consideration and why I tried to use the bipod I already had. Using a front rest adds to the gear weight and items that need to be transported. I would prefer to use a bipod if I can find something suitable that costs less than $450.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Wenatchee, WA
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    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...tnumber=155546 + http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...tnumber=153528

    or

    http://www.gggaz.com/index.php?id=63&parents=144,145

    Go to your local Safeway/Fred Meyers or equivalent, and get one of the thin flexible plastic cutting boards - a few bucks for three, probably.

    Set the plastic 'mat' out in front of your firing position, and have pretty much identical behavior regardless of whether the firing line is concrete, cinder ash, 3/4 minus rock, gravel, grass, sand...

    If you end up getting something with a wider foot print, like the Sinclair or a Center Shot... take two of the plastic mats and put a couple velcro dots on them so they over lap by an inch or so. Voila!

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Plymouth, Ca
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    Sinclair bipod = good as a front rest (if you know how to use it).
    Just set 11 National records in F-T/R with one.
    Jerry

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    10
    Set the plastic 'mat' out in front of your firing position, and have pretty much identical behavior regardless of whether the firing line is concrete, cinder ash, 3/4 minus rock, gravel, grass, sand...

    If you end up getting something with a wider foot print, like the Sinclair or a Center Shot... take two of the plastic mats and put a couple velcro dots on them so they over lap by an inch or so. Voila!
    Haha! I do the same thing, but I use the rear floor mat out of my car! The spikey nubs and stiff underside make firing line conditions a whole lot more consistent.

  7. #22
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    Sep 2009
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    Weld Cty (CO)
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    Car floor mat

    Quote Originally Posted by Heavies View Post
    Haha! I do the same thing, but I use the rear floor mat out of my car! The spikey nubs and stiff underside make firing line conditions a whole lot more consistent.
    Me too! - NHK

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    7
    The spikey nubs and stiff underside make firing line conditions a whole lot more consistent.
    Noticed this in the NRA F(TR) rules...
    The use of any form of a table is prohibited. Separate flat boards or plates not exceeding the dimensions
    of the individual rests by two inches are allowed to be placed under the front and/or rear rests. In the
    case of a bipod, the board or plate may not exceed the width of the bipod by 2", nor be more than 12"
    front to rear. See Rule 3.4.1(a)(1).
    No leveling screws or protrusions are allowed on these boards or plates. They must be flat on the top
    and bottom..
    The spikey nubs are not allowed, the surface must be flat. Let me know if I'm wrong about this.

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    10
    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Perkins View Post
    Noticed this in the NRA F(TR) rules...


    The spikey nubs are not allowed, the surface must be flat. Let me know if I'm wrong about this.
    Dunno, don't think the floor mat would be considered a 'board or plate' it's not really hard or flat. ?? Don't know for sure though...

  10. #25
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    Feb 2003
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    Wenatchee, WA
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    Terry,

    Given that the nubs don't really protrude into the ground plus the mat being flexible i.e. not a board or plate, I think it'd probably fly. I got the NRA Ref @ the 2010 FCNC in Sacramento to look at my dual cutting-sheet setup and he deemed that even though it was outside the 'footprint' it wasn't stiff enough (i.e. it can be rolled up in a tube) to be a board or plate and was good to go. I might be wrong... but there are other things that offend my sense of 'right' more than someone using the floor mat from their car - like a certain shooter who has a wooden 'cleat' attached to the front edge of his mat to give him something to push against and load his bipod. I have a hard time finding anything specific in the rules against that. It'd probably be a bigger deal if he started running away from the pack, though.

    Monte

  11. #26
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    Feb 2003
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    7
    Monte,

    I believe it could have been successfully argued that the wooden cleat on the front edge went against the rule of a flat surface. So, I was thinking what if the nubs were on the upside of the mat?

    Terry P

  12. #27
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    Feb 2003
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    Wenatchee, WA
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    I think there they would interfere with tracking under recoil, and a person would be better off with a plastic sheet like what I use

  13. #28
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    Sep 2009
    Location
    Weld Cty (CO)
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    Bipod

    Quote Originally Posted by milanuk View Post
    I think there they would interfere with tracking under recoil, and a person would be better off with a plastic sheet like what I use
    I think this is rather humorous, and I don't mean your comment, but I mentioned tracking under recoil with a bipod and was informed I was shooting all wrong awhile back. I was informed I must preload the bipod and hold the recoil with a bipod when I mentioned I discovered I could shoot better off the varnished top on my portable bench than the cement tops at the range because of the ability to track with the rubber feet on my Harris bipods. I now use a piece of counter top with formica over the cement and the car mat on the ground. I went to the carpet car mat at Raton because of the cinder surface there and that was all I had available and then found it works over bunch grass at Cheyenne too. I stretched a poly tarp under the bipod when I shot the .50 BMG at Raton and that helped also, plus kept the muzzle brake from blowing up debri. - nhk

  14. #29
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    Feb 2003
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    Wenatchee, WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by nhkuehl View Post
    I was informed I was shooting all wrong awhile back. I was informed I must preload the bipod and hold the recoil
    It depends somewhat on what kind of bipod. Some of the tactical bipods (including the Harris) do seem to shoot better if you load them some - or at least they bounce less. In my experience the ski type bipods don't take pre-loading well and are better off with a neutral or light hold. I still put some shoulder pressure on them, but given that mine is sitting atop a slick plastic sheet, not very much.

    Raton was where I got turned on to these sheets, btw. I had been using a set of Pod-Paws at the time, which did fine on concrete and grass, and didn't sink in gravel, but that dang 500yd line @ Raton seems like its all cinder-ash and even the big feet on the Pod-Paws would sink in after a couple shots. A team mate was using those plastic sheets and not having any problems, so we went into Raton after the first night and found some of the plastic cutting sheets in the local IGA store

  15. #30
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    Sep 2009
    Location
    Weld Cty (CO)
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    Preload or track

    I think it comes down to what works best for you. I started shooting with a bipod on my own and had pretty much established my method before I was told how I needed to do it. My first bipod experience was with the .50 BMG and you are going to track with that. I 'think' I hold pretty neutral to slight pressure and move with the rifle. I shoot everything with a bipod now, off a bench or prone, .17 HMR to .308 Win. - nhk

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