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Thread: gimmick or useful?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    238

    gimmick or useful?

    21st century hydro seater? Is a gimmick or is it useful ? Is if worth the cash over other arbor presses?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    SW.Pa.
    Posts
    923
    Seating force seems to matter more at long range than short..... Now if your gun doesn't shoot sub..1 you may not see the difference at long range either...... jim

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    355
    i have shot "pressure" sorted ammo in matches.
    but honestly no testing, just reducing variables.
    tool has dust on it right now.
    ( it was not tall enough for my ammo and the maker provided no support)

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Maine & Palm Coast, Fl
    Posts
    6,249

    I watched a Bryan LitzVideo

    the other day and he said seating pressure didn't matter but exact powder charges and seating depth did. I weigh every charge and measure every seated bullet with Stony point fixture on a caliper. Pull bullets if they are too short by .001" Gotta measure everything all the time .

    Pete

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Fort Worth Texas
    Posts
    1,596
    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Wass View Post
    the other day and he said seating pressure didn't matter but exact powder charges and seating depth did. I weigh every charge and measure every seated bullet with Stony point fixture on a caliper. Pull bullets if they are too short by .001" Gotta measure everything all the time .

    Pete
    A saying from my project management days "If you don't measure it you can't control it"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    355
    go look at this vid, posted by lou m

    https://www.facebook.com/AMPannealin...74761662902170

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    7,910
    On my competition rifles, I try to tune with the lightest neck tension practical. This is especially true on my 30BR, where I have a good combination of a very light neck tension with the right seating depth. Finding the right seating depth will turn a .280 rile into a .200 rifle.

    For years, I read that 133 like a lot of neck tension. I followed this creed for years, and then started experimenting with a lighter neck tension, and finding a seating depth and tuner setting that shoots at a sub.200 level.

    I am finding more and more that seating depth is more important than neck tension.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    657
    "What get measured gets done" . . . sometimes even when it's wrong! Never underestimate the precision of tactile judgement . . . but that must be garnered via experience! RG

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Lower Dakota Territory
    Posts
    1,995
    Quote Originally Posted by R.G. Robinett View Post
    "What get measured gets done" . . . sometimes even when it's wrong! Never underestimate the precision of tactile judgement . . . but that must be garnered via experience! RG
    Dovetailing this with something I've found about lots stuff:

    "Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted."
    - Albert Einstein (1879-1955)


    Good shootin'. -Al

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Augusta, Maine & Palm Coast, Fl
    Posts
    6,249

    Right

    Quote Originally Posted by R.G. Robinett View Post
    "What get measured gets done" . . . sometimes even when it's wrong! Never underestimate the precision of tactile judgement . . . but that must be garnered via experience! RG
    He who measures everything, keep meticulous notes and intermittently tests after something is established, gets things done. There is no substitute for precise. I've been preaching this for how many years now?

    Pete

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Wilcox, PA
    Posts
    586

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    on my competition rifles, i try to tune with the lightest neck tension practical. This is especially true on my 30br, where i have a good combination of a very light neck tension with the right seating depth. Finding the right seating depth will turn a .280 rile into a .200 rifle.

    For years, i read that 133 like a lot of neck tension. I followed this creed for years, and then started experimenting with a lighter neck tension, and finding a seating depth and tuner setting that shoots at a sub.200 level.

    I am finding more and more that seating depth is more important than neck tension.
    so right.

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