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Thread: Cleaning the rimfire....How much is enough ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    67

    Cleaning the rimfire....How much is enough ?

    Been reading on a couple of sites about rimfire cleaning, what to use, how to do it, what not to do, and some are even claiming they are not cleaning at all for 1000's of rounds with no loss in accuracy. I figure guys on here will know what works and what dont. Your input appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    27
    I saw this on Rimfire Accuracy, I clean my bench gun at 50 to 100 rounds.

    Gun Cleaning Procedure by Dan Killough
    I would like to thank Dan Killough for sending his rifle cleaning procedure in a recent e-mail from Killough Shooting Sports. Most of you are probably on Dan's e-mail list but in the event you missed it here it is:

    One of the most common questions I receive on the phone and at the test range is "What is your cleaning procedure?"
    I will share what we do and why. At the range, we clean after every 90-100 rounds. I do not have any of the data, but the engineers from Eley tell me that clean guns shoot better than dirty guns. They get this opinion from all of the data collected from the three Eley Test Ranges. They keep the test information from every rifle that has ever been tested in an Eley Test Range. When testing a rifle we note when we clean the rifle and data is collected on the fouling shots. They have crunched the numbers from this information and come to the conclusion that cleaning is a good thing for rimfire barrels. I have also drawn the same conclusion from my experience shooting benchrest. It has been my experience that every barrel loses accuracy once it becomes dirty, the point at which it loses accuracy is different for each barrel. Almost all of the competitions across rimfire whether 3-P, Benchrest, or Silhouette require somewhere between 25-100 shots before a competitor can easily clean their rifle. I also have not personally seen a rifle that could not shoot at least 100 rounds before losing accuracy due to fouling. So, we settled on 90-100 rounds in between cleanings.

    Now part 2, how do we actually clean. We use a bore guide that fits the cleaning rod tightly and the bore guide does not go all the way to the barrel, it stops at the loading ramp. I like to see the rod as it goes into the barrel so I can verify that it is going down the center of the barrel. I use a Kleen Bore Jag because it is the same diameter as my cleaning rod, we use Pro-Shot 1 1/8" square cleaning patches, and we use Pro-Shot 1-Step Solvent. I push one wet patch down the barrel and remove the patch at the muzzle. I then use a Short 10" cleaning rod with a .22 caliber Nylon brush and I scrub the first 2-3" of the barrel with a back and forth motion for about 10 strokes. This is to remove the combustion ring. I then push more wet patches until they come out clean. Typically this is about 4 patches. If we are still shooting the rifle, then I finish with a dry patch. If we are finished shooting, then I finish with a wet patch. I have bore scoped many .22 barrels and I have not found one yet that the nylon brush would not remove the combustion ring. In the past, I used a bronze brush, JB Bore Cleaner, or Iosso polish. They will remove combustion ring, but JB and Iosso are both removing metal from the barrel. They are removing very, very, little metal, but they are removing some. I do not believe the bronze brush will damage the barrel, but many people do not like to use bronze brushes on rimfire barrels. Now the Nylon brush could not possibly damage the barrel and I know it is getting the job done, so that is what I use.

    Also, if you are testing your rifle with us and you have a different cleaning regimen, we will be happy to follow it for your rifle. It is your rifle, and we will do everything we can to accommodate you.

    I hope you find this information helpful. Perhaps it is not the best cleaning regimen, but it has served me well. We only shoot lead bullets and the forces for a rimfire are not what a centerfire rifle is subjected to. Cleaning the rimfire is relatively easy and can be done in just a couple of minutes and I think it is extremely beneficial for accuracy. If you are not currently cleaning your rifle on a regular basis, I strongly urge you to do so.

    Until Next Time,

    Dan Killough

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Wilcox, PA
    Posts
    497

    Cool

    [QUOTE DAN THANKS I NEVER MET YOU I HAVE BEEN SHOOTING RIMFIRE FOR OVER 20YRS ALL OVER USA=1911Nut;838245]I saw this on Rimfire Accuracy, I clean my bench gun at 50 to 100 rounds.

    Gun Cleaning Procedure by Dan Killough
    I would like to thank Dan Killough for sending his rifle cleaning procedure in a recent e-mail from Killough Shooting Sports. Most of you are probably on Dan's e-mail list but in the event you missed it here it is:

    One of the most common questions I receive on the phone and at the test range is "What is your cleaning procedure?"
    I will share what we do and why. At the range, we clean after every 90-100 rounds. I do not have any of the data, but the engineers from Eley tell me that clean guns shoot better than dirty guns. They get this opinion from all of the data collected from the three Eley Test Ranges. They keep the test information from every rifle that has ever been tested in an Eley Test Range. When testing a rifle we note when we clean the rifle and data is collected on the fouling shots. They have crunched the numbers from this information and come to the conclusion that cleaning is a good thing for rimfire barrels. I have also drawn the same conclusion from my experience shooting benchrest. It has been my experience that every barrel loses accuracy once it becomes dirty, the point at which it loses accuracy is different for each barrel. Almost all of the competitions across rimfire whether 3-P, Benchrest, or Silhouette require somewhere between 25-100 shots before a competitor can easily clean their rifle. I also have not personally seen a rifle that could not shoot at least 100 rounds before losing accuracy due to fouling. So, we settled on 90-100 rounds in between cleanings.

    Now part 2, how do we actually clean. We use a bore guide that fits the cleaning rod tightly and the bore guide does not go all the way to the barrel, it stops at the loading ramp. I like to see the rod as it goes into the barrel so I can verify that it is going down the center of the barrel. I use a Kleen Bore Jag because it is the same diameter as my cleaning rod, we use Pro-Shot 1 1/8" square cleaning patches, and we use Pro-Shot 1-Step Solvent. I push one wet patch down the barrel and remove the patch at the muzzle. I then use a Short 10" cleaning rod with a .22 caliber Nylon brush and I scrub the first 2-3" of the barrel with a back and forth motion for about 10 strokes. This is to remove the combustion ring. I then push more wet patches until they come out clean. Typically this is about 4 patches. If we are still shooting the rifle, then I finish with a dry patch. If we are finished shooting, then I finish with a wet patch. I have bore scoped many .22 barrels and I have not found one yet that the nylon brush would not remove the combustion ring. In the past, I used a bronze brush, JB Bore Cleaner, or Iosso polish. They will remove combustion ring, but JB and Iosso are both removing metal from the barrel. They are removing very, very, little metal, but they are removing some. I do not believe the bronze brush will damage the barrel, but many people do not like to use bronze brushes on rimfire barrels. Now the Nylon brush could not possibly damage the barrel and I know it is getting the job done, so that is what I use.

    Also, if you are testing your rifle with us and you have a different cleaning regimen, we will be happy to follow it for your rifle. It is your rifle, and we will do everything we can to accommodate you.

    I hope you find this information helpful. Perhaps it is not the best cleaning regimen, but it has served me well. We only shoot lead bullets and the forces for a rimfire are not what a centerfire rifle is subjected to. Cleaning the rimfire is relatively easy and can be done in just a couple of minutes and I think it is extremely beneficial for accuracy. If you are not currently cleaning your rifle on a regular basis, I strongly urge you to do so.

    Until Next Time,

    Dan Killough[/QUOTE]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    North Eastern Australia
    Posts
    201
    Yep, the short scrubber cleaning brush used to clean the throat of the bore after 100 shots is quite useful for accuracy in my ancient Annie '54 using Tenex.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    169
    Then there's that thing about getting your rig TOO CLEAN? Scrub a dub dub too clean and you're starting all over again from scratch. Let the accuracy of your rig tell you if it needs cleaning or not.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    upstate, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,839
    Quote Originally Posted by Nor Cal Mikie View Post
    Then there's that thing about getting your rig TOO CLEAN? Scrub a dub dub too clean and you're starting all over again from scratch. Let the accuracy of your rig tell you if it needs cleaning or not.
    Pure bulls..t. The majority, the vast majority of match grade BR barrels get cleaned, usually every card, rarely more than 2. You go to a good/big match you’ll see plenty of cleaning.
    The builder of my guns, as well as considerable national champ/world record guns cleans after ever card....with a brush. There are a select few barrels that shoot dirty but very few.
    The ridiculous but ever present opinions on the “let the barrel tell you” crap never really thought too much about the prospect......what if your barrel tells you that right in the middle of a championship match ?
    If your barrel does not shoot great after a complete cleaning, odds are you need a barrel.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    Pure bulls..t. The majority, the vast majority of match grade BR barrels get cleaned, usually every card, rarely more than 2. You go to a good/big match you’ll see plenty of cleaning.
    The builder of my guns, as well as considerable national champ/world record guns cleans after ever card....with a brush. There are a select few barrels that shoot dirty but very few.
    The ridiculous but ever present opinions on the “let the barrel tell you” crap never really thought too much about the prospect......what if your barrel tells you that right in the middle of a championship match ?
    If your barrel does not shoot great after a complete cleaning, odds are you need a barrel.
    Thats what I am seeing at local matches, guys cleaning frequently, you read a lot of this on the net about guns not needing cleaned, I didnt believe it is why I asked here. Thanks Tim

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    upstate, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,839
    Quote Originally Posted by bigh View Post
    Thats what I am seeing at local matches, guys cleaning frequently, you read a lot of this on the net about guns not needing cleaned, I didnt believe it is why I asked here. Thanks Tim
    Gotta figure, KSS post above is from guy that owns ARA and ELEY test tunnel.
    About the only difference is I use, like many, Rimfire Blend and C4 carbon cutter in the throat which requires zero brushing/ scrubbing......simply safer.

    You’re welcome.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    188

    You're welcome

    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    Gotta figure, KSS post above is from guy that owns ARA and ELEY test tunnel.
    About the only difference is I use, like many, Rimfire Blend and C4 carbon cutter in the throat which requires zero brushing/ scrubbing......simply safer.
    .
    As always , Ya spot on Tim.
    Thanks for cleaning up a little B.S.
    Ray

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    upstate, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,839
    Quote Originally Posted by Rayhill View Post
    As always , Ya spot on Tim.
    Thanks for cleaning up a little B.S.
    Ray
    Hey, Ray, thanks, hope you’re healthy and safe.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    67
    Quote Originally Posted by tim View Post
    Gotta figure, KSS post above is from guy that owns ARA and ELEY test tunnel.
    About the only difference is I use, like many, Rimfire Blend and C4 carbon cutter in the throat which requires zero brushing/ scrubbing......simply safer.

    You’re welcome.
    Thanks Tim, I also use C4 and both the Rimfire Blend and also Pro shot One step, do you still brush the bore ?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    upstate, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,839
    Quote Originally Posted by bigh View Post
    Thanks Tim, I also use C4 and both the Rimfire Blend and also Pro shot One step, do you still brush the bore ?
    Yep

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    16

    Cleaning

    I shoot USBR Sporter class. I clean once before the match and find that my third target is always better. Go figure???

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    upstate, N.Y.
    Posts
    2,839
    Quote Originally Posted by jerryg22 View Post
    I shoot USBR Sporter class. I clean once before the match and find that my third target is always better. Go figure???
    Well, there is the possibility it takes a while to get it figured out.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    5,285
    Here's the deal. I know that some rifles shoot a bit better at some point but it seems that the owners don't know exactly when that point will occur...and even worse, when it will pass. If your rifle will not shoot competitively after cleaning and fouling then you simply have to get another barrel and hope it will. Note the word "competitively" please!

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