Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 40

Thread: how can i improve the finish of my bbl threading

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    252

    how can i improve the finish of my bbl threading

    i do not do much lathe work. i am on my SECOND bbl this YEAR.
    i thread, reverse, upside down going away from the head stock.
    TIn coated carbide threading tool in a very solid tool holder.
    currently i an slow...45 rpm, .003 cut with oil...the multi-pass guy.
    but my threads look like krap compared to "real" gunsmiths.
    they produce smooth shiney threads.....mine pretty rough.
    if i go up in speed( like carbide shoot be) i get concerned abiut halfnut engagement
    talk to me...
    my threads work..just do not look good

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    7,892
    I thread with a vertical TIN Coated insert at about 250 rpm using Rigid Dark Cutting oil. Insert tools like surface feet per minute to cut at optimum.

    You have to practice. Machine work is like anything else, the more you do, (correctly) the better you will get.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    252
    DARK it is, i'll have to just practice.
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    I thread with a vertical TIN Coated insert at about 250 rpm using Rigid Dark Cutting oil. Insert tools like surface feet per minute to cut at optimum.

    You have to practice. Machine work is like anything else, the more you do, (correctly) the better you will get.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    6,526
    For good quality threads on barrel steel you need a tool with POSITIVE top rake and set on vertical center. not above or below center.

    Also with the tool retracted slightly, manually run the tool to where you want it to stop in relation to the barrel shoulder, then make a good mark on the left bedway and carriage wing. with the tool retracted, practice watching that convergence mark, not the tool itself.

    Always thread toward the shoulder and use a good grade of cutting oil. with a tool with positive top rake (TPG for example),that way the cutting oil is at the cut.


    .

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Surprise, AZ
    Posts
    282
    Is your compound set to 29.5*? You can thread by plunging the cross-slide, but the angle is easier on less rigid setups. Of course choke up on your tools as much as practical. Either speed up the lathe, or switch to HSS. If you're using a standard quick-change toolpost, Aloris makes a pre-ground threading tool that's simplicity itself to sharpen. Finally, you can polish your threads with a Cratex stick - it won't remove chatter marks, but it'll make a decent thread smoother.

    GsT

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    7,892
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneT View Post
    Is your compound set to 29.5*? You can thread by plunging the cross-slide, but the angle is easier on less rigid setups. Of course choke up on your tools as much as practical. Either speed up the lathe, or switch to HSS. If you're using a standard quick-change toolpost, Aloris makes a pre-ground threading tool that's simplicity itself to sharpen. Finally, you can polish your threads with a Cratex stick - it won't remove chatter marks, but it'll make a decent thread smoother.

    GsT
    Strange, but in all of my years as a Machinist, I never use a compound at 29.5 degrees. I thread straight in.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    252
    i am using a solid tool holder, 0 degree and cutting away.
    sorry just no tool crash on a good part.
    yes i clean them up, they thread on smooth...but i know they can be better

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Northshore
    Posts
    385
    Quote Originally Posted by rsmithsr View Post
    i am using a solid tool holder, 0 degree and cutting away.
    sorry just no tool crash on a good part.
    yes i clean them up, they thread on smooth...but i know they can be better
    I thread kinda same way you do.. With my inserts RPMs helped. Can't hurt anything going away from the shoulder. At least 250 or more. Good luck.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ca.
    Posts
    698
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    Strange, but in all of my years as a Machinist, I never use a compound at 29.5 degrees. I thread straight in.
    I have often wondered why not Jackie I too was taught to use the compound and thanks for sharing that.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    252
    i was taught in lathe school to use 29. jackie was taught by his dad as i recall, not in a class.
    i use 0 with my current setup.
    anyone have a fact based comment on toward or away from the shoulder ? or was that based on 29*

    Quote Originally Posted by Louis.J View Post
    I have often wondered why not Jackie I too was taught to use the compound and thanks for sharing that.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Wilcox, PA
    Posts
    484

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by rsmithsr View Post
    i was taught in lathe school to use 29. Jackie was taught by his dad as i recall, not in a class.
    I use 0 with my current setup.
    Anyone have a fact based comment on toward or away from the shoulder ? Or was that based on 29*
    i w3as taught 29.5 after last pass go straight in 1 tho

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    California...unfortunately
    Posts
    723
    Quote Originally Posted by JerrySharrett View Post
    For good quality threads on barrel steel you need a tool with POSITIVE top rake and set on vertical center. not above or below center.

    Also with the tool retracted slightly, manually run the tool to where you want it to stop in relation to the barrel shoulder, then make a good mark on the left bedway and carriage wing. with the tool retracted, practice watching that convergence mark, not the tool itself.

    Always thread toward the shoulder and use a good grade of cutting oil. with a tool with positive top rake (TPG for example),that way the cutting oil is at the cut.


    .
    Jerry,

    Is that for HSS as well? I ask because I have the Warner HSS threading set-up and they recommend their positive rake threading insert for aluminum, and the neutral rake insert for steel.

    Justin

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    209
    Raise the RPMs to 5-800 and your finish should improve greatly. Im normally running around 600rpm treading away from the shoulder with a full profile carbide insert. Im taking about 50% of the depth of cut suggested by the mfg, taking about a dozen cuts to finish the thread. Make sure you have the tool on center. Im feeding straight in to be able to use the DRO with a locked cross slide.

    I chamber at most 10 barrels per year and have way to little lathe time to feel secure theading towards the shoulder with enough SFM to get a decent finish!

    Regards,
    Peter Ericson

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Surprise, AZ
    Posts
    282
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    Strange, but in all of my years as a Machinist, I never use a compound at 29.5 degrees. I thread straight in.
    I've heard several pros say that (and at least one that threads at 29.5*). It may be that it only helps on lighter machines and/or less rigid setups. Worth a shot, imo, if you're having problems.

    GsT

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Posts
    252
    my class was for small southbend lathes.
    Quote Originally Posted by GeneT View Post
    I've heard several pros say that (and at least one that threads at 29.5*). It may be that it only helps on lighter machines and/or less rigid setups. Worth a shot, imo, if you're having problems.

    GsT

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •