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Thread: dry firing to the surprise break

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    41
    Quote Originally Posted by WC_Harr View Post
    I just started shooting a few weeks ago so I don't know a lot but I used to study archery from a nationally ranked archer who is also a shooter who is now giving me rifle instruction.

    For those of you who train to the "surprise break" I'd like to know what you think about the way I'm dry firing. I think of the surprise break as the moment you go off an infinitely sharp cliff, such that no matter how close you get before the break you can always get closer without breaking the shot and to my mind this preserves the surprise of the break while continuously making the window of time in which the surprise break occurs smaller and smaller such that the subconscious can "time into the wobble". To my understanding the "surprise" is necessary to train to or you will "command the shot" with your conscious mind and hence possibly perform lower than might have been.

    Now, my question is what is wrong with thinking of the point of dry firing as being in actuality the attempt to put as much pull force on the trigger WITHOUT breaking the shot. Because it seems to me this both narrows the window of the surprise break to, lets say, infinitely narrow in time but without losing the surprise. So I'm focusing on how close I can get to the edge of an infinitely sharp cliff without going over.

    What do you think?

    Also, I don't understand the "steady pressure on the trigger" concept because my trigger takes I think 2.5lbs to break. Steady pressure, meaning one level of pull-force, will move the trigger to a point and no more. I assume what is meant is actually "steadily increasing pressure" on the trigger, which I think might have the same end result of what I'm doing but it seems to me that my way is more efficient, that if you focus on trying to NOT break the shot but while increasing the force its more direct and more clear of a task than trying to create "steadily increasing pressure" against a mechanical device that is opposing your force in a, I would say, nonlinear way. Too confusing. Why not just pull as hard as you can without breaking the shot, getting slower and finer as you get to the edge of the cliff.
    I think he is asking a question on offhand shooting, somehow this has turned into a shooting benchrest thread with 1 1/2 ounce triggers.
    Drags

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drags View Post
    I think he is asking a question on offhand shooting, somehow this has turned into a shooting benchrest thread with 1 1/2 ounce triggers.
    Drags
    And I think you don't know anything about triggers.....

    FYI, there are thousands more "high end triggers" sold to offhand shooters than to the tiny BR crowd.

    I stand by what I said, if'n you wanna' 'choot off y'er hindfeets look longly and strongly at Huber, Timney, TriggerTech and Tubb ..... even though Jewell still has a strong following amongst the 2.5lb crowd (including myself)

    A good 2.5lb trigger will make a setup work VS just "go bang"

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    41
    Quote Originally Posted by alinwa View Post
    And I think you don't know anything about triggers.....

    FYI, there are thousands more "high end triggers" sold to offhand shooters than to the tiny BR crowd.

    I stand by what I said, if'n you wanna' 'choot off y'er hindfeets look longly and strongly at Huber, Timney, TriggerTech and Tubb ..... even though Jewell still has a strong following amongst the 2.5lb crowd (including myself)

    A good 2.5lb trigger will make a setup work VS just "go bang"
    You did say that you don't know much about shooting off your hindfeet.



    drags

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Posts
    214
    Okay, so my story on BR triggers. I've been a hunter since I was young, but never with a light trigger. So, we have foxes getting our ducks and chickens and I know from which direction they are coming, so I set up a bench, put my rests on it and sit back with a cold beer and wait. Not really expecting to be successful, I was surprised when coming across the field was a big red fox, heading my way. Now anyone that actually has intentions to kill an animal, knows you get an adrenaline rush when the prey shows itself. First thing you do is go into firing position, insert finger into the trigger guard and find the trigger. -----Well, that don't work with a BR trigger, kicked up dirt about 20 feet in front of it. I later shot it with my wife's 7-08 deer rifle.
    I think this is sort of on topic.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
    Posts
    10,986
    Quote Originally Posted by CharlieH View Post
    Okay, so my story on BR triggers. I've been a hunter since I was young, but never with a light trigger. So, we have foxes getting our ducks and chickens and I know from which direction they are coming, so I set up a bench, put my rests on it and sit back with a cold beer and wait. Not really expecting to be successful, I was surprised when coming across the field was a big red fox, heading my way. Now anyone that actually has intentions to kill an animal, knows you get an adrenaline rush when the prey shows itself. First thing you do is go into firing position, insert finger into the trigger guard and find the trigger. -----Well, that don't work with a BR trigger, kicked up dirt about 20 feet in front of it. I later shot it with my wife's 7-08 deer rifle.
    I think this is sort of on topic.
    LOL


    I can relate..... I used to take my BR guns varmint hunting along with hunting rifles and pistols. I recall several times trying to get coyotes and badgers with BR gear. I learned that fine crosshairs and an eighth inch dot get completely lost in the sage, and when you DO find a reticule and you reach for that trigger, good luck finding it!

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