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Thread: Bore cleaning discoveries?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2015
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    75

    Bore cleaning discoveries?

    Having just purchased a Teslong bore snake and then using it on every barrel I had (13) I found that I wasn't getting the carbon out as well as I thought I was. So I broke out the ISSO and the JB Bore Paste and scrubbed the carbon out pretty darn quickly. Way more quickly than a brush and Hoppes did. An old Savage 112 BVSS in 220 Swift was carbon city from dog town safaris. Heat checked yes from maybe 700 rnds but not a bad throat overall. It was harder to get clean from copper and carbon fouling than all the others. I used Shooters Choice and also Sweets. The JB paste and maybe to a lesser degree ISSO cleaned faster than the chemical brews. What did you all discover about your cleaning routine after you could see the results better?

    Wallydog

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
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    157
    an actual CARBON CLEANER.
    the best is long gone, gm TEC top engine cleaner.
    outboard tec SEAFOAM is suppose to be good
    Subaru made a tec
    they all cost less than gun marketed products for the same job.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
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    Poetry, Tex.
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    Quote Originally Posted by rsmithsr View Post
    an actual CARBON CLEANER.
    the best is long gone, gm TEC top engine cleaner.
    outboard tec SEAFOAM is suppose to be good
    Subaru made a tec
    they all cost less than gun marketed products for the same job.

    I still have about 15-18 cans of the original GM Tec engine cleaner. I mix up a gallon of my homade cleaner at a time. I use 8oz of white ammonia and 8oz of Kroil. A gallon at a time will last a while.

  4. #4
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    Jul 2007
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    S.E. MI
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    Bore tech carbon cleaner works pretty good.......
    Yes, I saw the same thing. Whether Hawkeye or Teslong....

  5. #5
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    Feb 2003
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    Fbks,Alaska
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    'Flitz" metal polish paste in the tube works faster than JB's or ISSO products.

    Small to medium bore carbon removal is simple compared to VHP 50BMG bores.

    If/when you attempt to clean a 50BMG bore by conventional means...tennis elbow will ensue prior to accomplishing the task.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    120
    Quote Originally Posted by Butch Lambert View Post
    I mix up a gallon of my homade cleaner at a time. I use 8oz of white ammonia and 8oz of Kroil. A gallon at a time will last a while.
    My math skills are not all that good but 8oz of white ammonia and 8oz of Kroil to me adds up to a pint not a gallon. or is there something else in this magic brew ?????

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by UncleB View Post
    My math skills are not all that good but 8oz of white ammonia and 8oz of Kroil to me adds up to a pint not a gallon. or is there something else in this magic brew ?????

    Hey Uncle! I add that to the GM Tec and make a gallon. I tried waving my hand over the ammonia and Kroil, but it didn't multiply.

  8. #8
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    Dec 2003
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    washington.........STATE that is.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Butch Lambert View Post
    ................I tried waving my hand over the ammonia and Kroil, but it didn't multiply.

    did you try turning out the lights?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    24
    1. I would suggest a dedicated copper and a dedicated carbon remover, for guns or otherwise.

    2. As to weights and such, I am still scratching my head with machinists' terminology when they speak of two and not two one thousandth of an inch.

    Fotheringill n/k/a Still Befuddled

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Minnesota Arrowhead
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    37

    Flitz

    I've tried Carbon Killer, Carb Out, Wipe Out, CLR and a host of other heralded barrel cleaning products.

    Like Dan, I've found Flitz to be the best for removing stubborn carbon.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    24
    Dumb Query for the Day---

    Do you see a marked improvement on your target after removal of all carbon and copper?

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    75

    Not yet but?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fotheringill View Post
    Dumb Query for the Day---

    Do you see a marked improvement on your target after removal of all carbon and copper?
    Its still too cold here in the Peoples Republic of Northern Illinois to get out and do any serious rifle work. I don't expect miracle level group improvements but rather I now know that my regular cleaning routine wasn't doing what I thought it was doing. Especially in regards to carbon build up in live varmint rifles. The example being a Savage 112 220 Swift that was never a great barrel from day 1. It shot 1/2" reluctantly and that with sub velocity loads. I will again crank it up to 4000 and see if its any better with less carbon in the barrel. For the BR guns Im going to go with Flitz after an aggregate and check with a borescope.
    Wallydog
















    peoples republic of Illinois

  13. #13
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    Apr 2004
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    Montmorency Co, MI
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    peoples republic of Illinois (Copied from just above)

    Yes, especially Champaign...those college students must be really bad. On the other hand I bet many have gone home and are studying from there but loosing their room/board fees. I wonder if the colleges will have "meals on wheels/feet" to students rooms/?

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    California...unfortunately
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    Wallydog,

    What I discovered after investing in a borescope was that a good copper solvent on a brass brush removes copper fouling quite well. Prior to this, I had read many that opined that brushes worked on powder fouling, and solvents worked on copper fouling, and that was it. You use solvent on a patch to chemically remove the copper fouling, typically letting it soak for a spell. And it will...eventually. But in my observations, copper removal is greatly expedited with the use of copper solvent on a brass brush.

    My theory on this? You're getting the best of both worlds, with the chemical cleaning properties of the solvent being introduced via the abrasive/mechanical nature of a brush. As the solvent is softening and dissolving the copper, the brush is taking out the loose and soft stuff, scratching things up, and allowing the solvent to cover more area...get into more nooks and crannies to do the voodoo that it do. And this happens multiple times as we stroke back and forth with the brush in the barrel.

    To me, it's kinda like cleaning a part in a parts washer. You can take the parts brush dipped in solvent, and get some of the gunk off. Or you can just soak the part for a while, and get some of the gunk off. But if you really want a clean part, your part is soaked, and you're a scrubbing with that brush.

    Justin

  15. #15
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    Nov 2006
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    Augusta, Maine & Palm Coast, Fl
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    6,147

    One can expedite

    The process a bunch with Clover lapping compound on a patch when and if the carbon gets reallly stuck.

    Pete

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