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Thread: For The Traveling Gunsmith To Have On Hand

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
    Posts
    10,455
    do you have a link?

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Branchville, NJ
    Posts
    487
    This is one www.wswells.com The South Bend sub forum on Practical Machinist has some too, probably double posted.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    West central NH
    Posts
    521
    Would have liked to become a master machinist, but that era had mostly passed when I got into it. Unions did not want you to learn more than one machine, because that meant less total people in the work force and thus less union membership.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    washington.........STATE that is.
    Posts
    10,455
    on the other hand......

    http://theoldmotor.com/?p=159287

    My wife and I have daydreamed about this sort of thing, especially with a modern sleeper and more quarters in the trailer....

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ca.
    Posts
    534
    Al that was pretty damn cool and makes one wonder what happened to that Rig.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Texas Panhandle
    Posts
    1,932
    Quote Originally Posted by jackie schmidt View Post
    My Dad taught me the Machinist trade, the only place I have ever drawn a paycheck from besides our Shop was the two years I had to spend in the Army when I was drafted back in the '60's.

    One of the things my Dad taught me from day one, (and I try to instill in the men I teach), is the most important aspect of Machine Shop work is to learn WHY you do things a certain way. You can teach anybody how to do something, it is simply a matter of repetition and following directions. The important thing to learn is WHY you do things. Once you have a general knowledge of why things are done a certain way, you can transfer this knowledge to other aspects of machining, and operation and function of machinery in general.

    A while back, a customer asked me to assist in the alignment of a large marine gear to the Propellar Shaft and then the Diesel engine to the gear. This was a 3500 HP set. I not only showed his men how do do the procedure, but explained to them why you needed exact alignment of the output gear flange to the shaft coupling. Why you then aligned the engine to the gear in a certain manner so to allow for heat expansion in the verticle and horizontal. And then why you had to secure it all properly so there was no deflection in any of the criticle parts, and then making sure nothing could move under the normal operation of the vessel.


    At my shop, we have no CNC machines. It's not because we would not like them, it's just that the type of work we do simply does not lend it's self to type of work performed on CNC machines.
    Besides the fact that CNC equipment the size youd need would cost a fortune if they even make it.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Texas Panhandle
    Posts
    1,932
    With all the fancy loading trailers Ive seen at matches. One of these days I expect to see a loading trailer with a Heavy 10 set up on the other side of the trailer. Maybe even a kitchen sink 😆

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